The Eleventh Hour

Today’s guest post is by Tima from Living Water

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Why is it that only when we are preparing to say “good-bye” we come to realize the true value of what we have?
Last week I managed to organize our storage area and get rid of some items we no longer need or use.  A few days later something came to mind that I feel compelled to share.
Among the pile of items we no longer use, we found an old favorite toy of the boys that we obviously forgot we still had. This toy had been put away for a few years (that’s how long it’s been since we went through our storage space) When we dug out the toy, we were discerning whether to donate it or sell it, but as all of you Mom’s know, our boys wouldn’t hear of separating from this toy, so they are now enjoying their reunion and playing with it again.
It struck me that at times we treat our faith the same way. Especially for those of us born and raised in a Catholic family. I have witnessed a few times, among my family & friends that only when they are facing the end of their earthly lives do they come to appreciate the faith that was instilled in them as children. Somewhere along their adolescent and adult life they felt their faith life wasn’t as important, but once they deal with a serious illness, or come face to face with their mortality they realize that clinging to God and preparing for heaven is much more important than any accomplishments they may or may not have had in their earthly life.
I am not meaning to undermine or insult anyone. In fact, I am so grateful for God’s mercy, that He allows us this opportunity to be saved, even at the 11th hour of our lives. I have come to also appreciate what it means to have a good death. A good death is when we are given time to prepare, when we are given time to reconcile with God and with our family and friends.
The sad part about this reality is those poor souls who are waiting for the 11th hour, but instead face their mortality suddenly. What of those who are not given the opportunity to reconcile with God and their loved one’s prior to departing from this earth.  We have to trust in God’s mercy, since He knows their hearts and the condition of their souls.
Are we waiting for the 11th hour to put things right with God and our family or friends?
In recent years I have to come to appreciate the value of a single soul. We look at the life of Christ and realize that many see His mission as a failure. The only time Christ’s mission can be seen as a failure is when a soul dies without Him. Then it’s like Christ’s blood was poured out for nothing.
Through my friendship with Christ, I know that Christ’s mission was not a failure. I know the peace I have found and the difference He has made in my marriage and in my family.
If you feel compelled, this is a great time to meditate on “The Good Thief” found in Luke 23:39-43
This has been written in loving memory of my family & friends who have gone ahead of us; I pray you are interceding for us from heaven.

More of Tima’s musings can be found at:  http://livingwater-rcmom.blogspot.com/

photo by StarrGazr 


Comments

  1. Definitely NOT a failure. It changed the whole world, including those who do not wish to admit it. Look, for example, how we count years — and that is only one simple thing.